Put Away the Rose-Colored Glasses

7/11/2011

by Thomas P. Smith Jr.
Ah, the old rose-colored glasses. You know the ones I’m talking about. I don’t wear them all of the time, but I keep them handy. They are always around when I need them.

Every summer when the Dallas Cowboys go to training camp (that’s right — I’m a Cowboy fan … go ahead and have your fun), I pull out my rose colored glasses and all the flaws that other people see in my team disappear. When I wait until the very last minute to go to the store to buy something I desperately need, I pop on my rose-colored glasses and convince myself that there is no need to worry — they’ll have what I’m looking for, it will be on sale, and there will be no line at the checkout. Life is good with those rose-colored glasses!

Football teams and shopping sprees are trivial matters. A crooked view of life through my glasses on those topics doesn’t hurt me much. But sometimes those glasses are big trouble.

You know you need life insurance. I know: it’s not a glitzy purchase … it’s not something you show off to your friends … but you know you need it. If you have some, chances are pretty good — great actually — that you need more. And you know why you need it. It’s all about your family. It’s not about you. It’s about them.

So, assuming you know you need it, and I know you need it, why aren’t we getting together to arrange for it? Those glasses.

The glasses go on and we decide to wait until tomorrow, because after all, nothing bad can happen today. And when nothing bad happens today, those glasses go on much easier and fit much better tomorrow, because, after all, if nothing went wrong yesterday, what are the chances that something will go wrong tomorrow?

You’re feeling good, you’re looking good, you’re loving life, and you have so many other, more important things to do with your hard earned cash. The only time you really think about life insurance, really, is when we call you. And for a brief second when that call comes in, or when you’re reading this column, or when you see your agent, you say to yourself: you know, I really need to take care of that. But then the glasses come out, slide over that nose, and suddenly, tomorrow is a better option than today.

In the end, thinking that the Dallas Cowboys are going to go 16–0 and win the Super Bowl every year is foolish, but not dangerous. Thinking that you have an unlimited supply of tomorrows to make a decision on securing the future for your wife and children and grandchildren is both foolish and dangerous.

Put away the glasses (temporarily) and talk with your agent. We’ll make your life really rosy.

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