Knights of Columbus Emblems

Help

 • Instructions
 • JPG Files
 • BMP Files
 • EPS Files

This page offers Knights of Columbus emblems in several different formats, and your choice of format will depend on the use you have in mind.

Graphics can be downloaded and used in newsletters, on Web sites and on program and event promotions. Our new Logos and Emblems pages also offer EPS (Encapsulated PostScript ) files that can be enlarged without loss of quality, making them useful for making banners. Graphics are available in the following categories:

Marian Hour of Prayer • Logos • Emblems • Youth Programs
• Father McGivney • Occasions • Miscellaneous

Emblems PPT CMYK RGB RGB BW

JPG
(190 kb)

EPS
(409 kb)

PNG
(125 kb)
BMP
(450 kb)
BMP
(457 kb)

ICO
(8 kb)

EPS
(420 kb)

EPS
(386 kb)

JPG
(166 kb)

EPS
(414 kb)

PNG
(198 kb)
BMP
(575 kb)
BMP
(575 kb)

ICO
(12 kb)

EPS
(1.46 mb)

EPS
(1.46 mb)

JPG
(691 kb)

EPS
(877 kb)

PNG
(941 kb)
BMP
(6.9 mb)
BMP
(6.9 mb)

ICO
(12 kb)

EPS
(889 kb)

EPS
(874 kb)

JPG
(658 kb)

EPS
(5.7 mb)

PNG
(194 mb)
BMP
(7.5 mb)
BMP
(7.5 mb)

ICO
(12 kb)

EPS
(5.4 mb)

EPS
(1.9 mb)

JPG
(218 kb)

EPS
(403 kb)

PNG
(257 kb)
BMP
(1.1 mb)
BMP
(1.1 mb)

ICO
(11.5 kb)

EPS
(415 kb)

EPS
(395 kb)

Instructions

Files under the column marked PPT are designed to be imported as graphics into word processing documents like Microsoft Word or Powerpoint. Files under the column marked CMYK are comprised using  four basic colors (cyan, magenta, yellow and black), the standard in the print industry. Files under the RGB column are comprised using three basic colors (red, green and blue), the standard for laser printers.

Bitmap formats (including .jpg and .bmp extensions) use fewer pixels to create an image, and are recommended for use in posting material on Web sites, and for use in council newsletters or similar applications.

They can be reduced in size without a change in image quality, but they cannot be enlarged to any significant degree because the result will be “pixelated,” with ragged edges and poor resolution.

Vector formats use mathematical formulas to describe the image, and are said to be “scalable,” because they can be enlarged without any adverse impact on quality.

On this page, we offer emblems in .eps format, and while such files are not strictly speaking vector files, they describe a vector image. An EPS file is actually a program that describes an image, and like a pure vector file, is scalable. EPS files are for more advanced users, though, because they require advanced graphics programs that are able to open and use them.

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JPG Files

Click on the JPG link and the image will open. Right click your mouse and save to your desktop or a file folder. The JPG file may be imported into Word, Powerpoint or other document.

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PNG Files

Click on the PNG link and the image will open. Right click your mouse and save to your desktop or a file folder. The PNG file may be imported into Word, Powerpoint or other document.

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ICO Files

Click on the ICO link and the image will open. Right click your mouse and save to your desktop or a file folder.

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BMP Files

Click on the BMP link and the image will open. Right click your mouse and save to your desktop or a file folder. The BMP file may be imported into Word, Powerpoint or other document.

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EPS Files

The Encapsulated Postscript (EPS) file is available for all high-quality printing. EPS files use a vector format and can be scaled up or down without loss of quality.

EPS files may be imported or placed into a document to be printed. EPS files are for more advanced users, though, because they require advanced graphics programs that are able to open and use them.

Some computer operating systems will add a .ps (postscript file) extension when downloading or opening EPS files from the Web. This may affect the way photo editing applications view the file. If you encounter this problem, please follow the instructions below when downloading EPS images.

1. Select the EPS link you wish, four-color (CMYK) for print, three-color (RGB) for laser or Web use, or black and white, and click on it.

2. When pop-up box appears, click on “Save This File to Disk” and then click on “OK.”

3. When second pop-up window appears, select the drive or desktop you want to save the image to.

4. In the “Save As” box, check to see if  “.eps” appears after the image name. If it does not, add .eps to the name (example, 3rdDegree_CMYK.eps). If the computer accidentally adds a “.ps” to the end of the image name, delete  it.

5. Click on “Save” to save image to drive.

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